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Merry Christmas

2023/12/25 — Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas! And a Happy New Year! We wish you all the best of luck for all your projects... the persistence to overcome obstacles, the courage to triumph over adversity, and the magic touch to make all your dreams come true! Hoping to see you all soon at a future show!

new album

2015/08/04 — New album: Pickin' The Blues! Hello friends! We're glad to announce the release of Stephane Home's new album, Pickin' The Blues. A solo album of traditional country blues. Just the man and his guitar, recorded completely live in one single take. That's the blues!

new album

2015/08/01 — Welcome to the new website! Awaited for a long time, and finally online! You can now listen to Stephane Home's music, check the videos and read the stories... Works with computers, tablets and smartphones!

Contact

info@stephanehome.com

Tour dates

2023/12/30 — Private show

New Album
Pickin' The Blues

Pickin' The Blues! Recorded live in the studio, in one single live take on a sunny summer afternoon, Pickin' The Blues is Stephane Home's debut album. Just the man and his guitar, like the old bluesmen in the old days... Rooted in tradition, yet with a modern touch, the album is filled with a very personal way of playing and singing. Just like a good ol' drink of liquor: Slow down, relax and sip the sweet long lasting touch of this beautiful album!

    October 2013 was the time to visit the fantastic and extra-cool Washboard Chaz in the legendary town of New Orleans. With its typical streets, houses, colors, jazz sounds and spicy food, New Orleans is a home for musicians. After a show on Frenchmen street, we went back to the courtyard late at night and shot a few videos before the plane the next morning. A glass of Gaillac wine and a few songs later, we decided we should think of planning a tour in France. On this video you can see us playing "Step It Up And Go" and, the Blind Boy Fuller classic, by the pool of the Jean Lafitte House, a famous pirate who lived in New Orleans.

    After the lively "Step It Up And Go", here's a very slow blues well suited for the midnight hour! "You Got To Move" by Mississippi Fred McDowell. Relax and enjoy the slow groove of the washboard and the sweetness of the slide guitar ringing in the night.

    A few more pictures and videos from New Orleans — Playing together with Washboard Chaz and Andy J. Forest at The Spotted Cat on Frenchmen Street — The Preservation Hall, where people are queueing every night to enjoy traditional jazz by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band — At the corner of Toulouse Street and Royal Street, where you can find (Playing For Change) Grandpa Elliott singing and sometimes eating the Louisiana famous Alligator Sausage — Then a rare and exclusive video of Chaz teaching washboard — And another video of Chaz solo, singing Day O, the Harry Belafonte classic. Welcome to N'awlins!

    These are two videos from a very nice evening for the dancers at Studio Hop in Toulouse, France. Playing Jazz (Dream A Little Dream Of Me) and Chicago blues with guitar and harmonica. Enjoy the music and watch the talent of the dancers swinging in harmony.

    And this is the blues one on the harmonica.

    What more authentic and colorful than playing traditional country blues inside a wooden shack? Discover the songs of Charlie Patton, Blind Blake, Robert Johnson, or Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee... This will take you on a journey back in time and through the Mississippi Delta and the Piedmont area.

    Port Townsend Acoustic Blues 2011. This festival is a unique gathering of blues masters from all over the USA and from every instrument. It is a must see. That's the place where I met Washboard Chaz for the first time. Washboard Chaz is the only professional washboard player in the world and he is a key figure of New Orleans. Blind Boy Paxton is a young virtuoso musician, who kind of plays anything that falls into his hands, may it be guitar, banjo, fiddle or piano. We had a lot of fun playing together! Also Lauren Sheehan on mandolin and Jay Summerour on harmonica. The song we play, Going Down Slow, is from Eric Bibb's duet with Taj Mahal on his "Friends" album.

    Port Townsend was also a good chance to meet Corey Harris and Phil Wiggins again after Merlefest 2010. This pair teams up beautifully. I also was lucky to share time with Guy Davis and Pura Fe, and also to sing "Going Down Slow" backstage with Taj Mahal!

    Here are a few more blues recordings over the years with guitar and harmonica. Recordings from the Cahors Folk Club, playing all kinds of blues songs from Big Bill Broonzy, Charlie Patton, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Tommy Johnson, Bukka White, Rory Block, Eric Bibb, and Keb' Mo'. Watch the videos!

    More blues. Fortunately, American blues musicians also tour across Europe and every once in a while I get a chance to be in touch with them when they pay a visit. Here at the Jazz In Marciac Festival in 2013, backstage with Eric Bibb and Taj Mahal after the show was cancelled due to the storm — With Eric Bibb in Paris during a recording session for the "Blues People" album — Another session with Eric Bibb and Guy Davis — With Eric Bibb and Habib Koite in 2012 in Marciac. Thank you for the opportunity and the company!

    Of the many musicians that left their footprint on American traditional music, one of the most beloved is Doc Watson. Blind in his very early years, Doc was as much a gentle soul as a remarkably gifted guitar picker and singer. He influenced thousands of musicians all around the world, and delighted audiences all along his long career. Merlefest is a festival in honor of Doc and his son Merle. Every year it gathers fantastic talents in old time music, bluegrass, and acoustic Blues. The year I attended, in 2010, I had the chance to see such legends as Doc Watson, with his partner David Holt on the banjo, the Nashville Bluegrass Band, Corey Harris and Phil Wiggins, John Hammond, Happy Traum, Taj Mahal, Sam Bush and others. Seeing so many talents in the same place at the same time was worth crossing the Atlantic... Of course I had my chance to talk with Doc. I told him I had been a long time follower of his, and that I came all the way from France. He said to me "Bless you heart"... That sounds so much like him! And after being blessed by Doc Watson, nothing can ever go wrong!

    Hello friends! Here are two videos of good ol' bluegrass and from the Appalachian mountains! As a duo with Araz on the bass, and solo at the Cahors Folk Club. Enjoy the banjo and the flatpicking guitar! Have a taste of a little White House Blues and Salt Creek, and some more classics from Doc Watson!

    In addition to American music, I also have a big bag full or Irish songs in my repertoire! I love the Clancy Brothers. If you ever have a chance to watch Liam Clancy's "Live At The Bitter End" concert, I highly recommend it. Pete Seeger too has great Irish songs in his live recordings. I played for many years in the Dubliner's Pub in Toulouse, and shared the evening and the stage with a famous local duo called The Tips. The songs below were recorded at a rehearsal with some friends who were scattered over different areas, but happened to be here at the same time on an occasion. The microphones were turned on, and with just a little mastering magic from the studio, here is the result! With Araz on the bass, Fanny on the flute and Felix on the violin. Enjoy!

      Madagascar music is another side of my musical roots. I first met Erick Manana at the New Morning in 2002 when he was celebrating his 20 years of career. I discovered him at a Graeme Allwright concert in Le Havre a few years earlier. The show was such a blast that I stayed stuck to his music ever since. I learnt to play and sing his songs in Malagasy, all by ear. This very unusual endeavour led me to friendship with world famous artists from Madagascar. Mahaleo, the legendary band invited me on stage for their 30 anniversary tour in Paris in 2005, in front of a 3000 people audience. I also played on stage once with Lolo Rakotomanga, the leader of the band Lolo Sy Ny Tariny. Erick Manana, Mahaleo and Lolo Sy Ny Tariny are national treasures and regularly fill stadiums in Madagascar, such as the Palais des Sports de Tananarive, or international venues like the New Morning and the Olympia in Paris. I have fun stories to tell with the Madagascan musicians. At some time they found me so much in love with the music that they repeatedly advised me not to go to Madagascar before the end of my studies, fearing that I would leave everything and not take the plane back! Looking back, they were probably right... but hopefully I was wise enough to follow their advice. This means I still have to make the trip! Another time I was playing "Mila Rano" in front of Erick Manana and Dama, a song about the lack of water and the river Betsiboka. All of a sudden, they started a big laugh. Erick said: "if the river Betsiboka hears him, it is going to run away from its river bed"...

      Below are two those songs from Erick Manana. "Barikavily" is the name of a tiny train station, which turns into a market full of life and sound. It has the typical ternary rhythm of Madagascar, and a very wild and haunting singing style.

      "Zakelina Mama" is the song of a happy man seeing the woman of his heart coming! It is one of Erick Manana's most popular songs, a highlight at every show, as well as a masterpiece of guitar work! It will make you wanna sing, clap, and dance!

      Elliott Murphy is the first professional musician I ever met. A romantic poet as well as a generous showman and authentic rock'n'roll star... Over 20 years ago when I was living in Le Havre, France, I discovered his "Beauregard" album in a music store, and I immediately bought this elegant and soulful piece of music. That very same week I was looking for a guitar teacher, as I was only starting the instrument, and by a somehow lucky and extraordinary coincidence, the teacher happened to be... Elliott's guitarist Olivier Durand. What a glorious coincidence. The first show I saw of the duo was at the McDaid's pub in Le Havre, and I remember this very inspiring and enthusiastic performance. Elliott is also a great story teller, and used to always invite someone from the audience to tell us about the O' Henry Story, before he started playing his song "Small Room". The show would follow with his masterpiece "On Elvis Presley's Birthday", and the concert would end with several encores including some "Diamonds By The Yard", "Party Girls and Broken Poets", and "Route 66", playing like a devil on the harmonica. All this had a lot of charm and magic. It also had quite an impact on the young musician I was. Later, he let me in the studio while he was recording his next albums. I finally had the privilege and honor to be invited on stage, as it is immortalized on the pictures above. Rockin' on stage with, as they say, "The Last Of The Rock Stars"... A long time later, when Elliott heard me play again, he said: "You sound just like a young old bluesman". I found this a very witty quote and I still have it written on my business cards. Some favorite albums: Beauregard (1998), April A Live Album (1999), Live Hot Point (1989).